Latest draft of WESS 2015 open for discussion and comments

The latest draft chapters of WESS 2014/2015 are now available for discussion and feedback.

World Economic and Social Survey 2014/2015: Overview (UNEDITED DRAFT)

World Economic and Social Survey 2014/2015: Chapter I (UNEDITED DRAFT)

World Economic and Social Survey 2014/2015: Chapter II (UNEDITED DRAFT)

World Economic and Social Survey 2014/2015: Chapter III (UNEDITED DRAFT)

World Economic and Social Survey 2014/2015: Chapter IV (UNEDITED DRAFT)

World Economic and Social Survey 2014/2015: Chapter V (UNEDITED DRAFT)

World Economic and Social Survey 2014/2015: Chapter VI (UNEDITED DRAFT)

World Economic and Social Survey 2014/2015: References (UNEDITED DRAFT)

One comment:

  1. Concerning Chapter I I want to consider the following:

    1) In a Global Index Benchmark we”ve been conducting with nine international Indices including the Human Development Index we not only identified an extreme correlation between HDI and GDP (PPP), but a strong unilateral bias that can be seen in the standard deviation. We will soon publish the complete Excel file. Therefore we cant not share the praise of the HDI in this chapter.

    2) The Human Development Report expresses a completely outdated and unilateral perspective on development issues. This strongly biased perspective has recently been repeated by Jeffrey Sachs and Richard Layard in the World Happiness Report.

    3) Besides chosing unilateral indicators such as governance, education, health and security – issues that can be provided as public goods if the state has tax-money – one reason is the use of aggregated data from GWP (Gallup World Poll) and WVS (World Values Survey). Both work with binary and unilateral questions.

    4) We”ve been trying to contact the UNDP and the Worldbank in order to discuss perspectives and progress to measuring developing countries for years yet. Normally you cannot neither phone nor write a mail and will never get more response than from a “service desk”.

    5) We hope that that will change in the future and that once we will be allowed to present and to discuss new methods on assessing developing countries with less bias.

Comments are closed.